Germanwing plane crash airplane

German Muslim Terrorist Co-Pilot Treated For Multiple Psychological Disorders

German Muslim Terrorist Co-Pilot Treated For Multiple Psychological Disorders

Germanwing plane crash airplane

Killer co-pilot sought treatment for problems with his VISION and was treated by neurologists for ‘severe overload syndrome’ and a ‘serious psychosomatic illness’

  • The pilot concealed medical conditions that would have stopped him flying, including psychological disorders
  • Andreas Lubitz should have been off sick on day he deliberately crashed plane into mountainside
  • Torn-up sick notes have been found in 27-year-old’s flat which showed he had hidden extent of illnesses from Germanwings
  • Lubitz had sought help for vision problems in the weeks leading up to the crash despite being deemed ‘fit to fly’
  • He told former girlfriend he was planning an act so horrifying his name would be remembered forever
  • He was a master of hiding his darkest thoughts and frightened his former lover so much she decided to leave him

Killer co-pilot Andreas Lubitz sought treatment for problems with his vision in the weeks before he deliberately crashed his Germanwings A320 Airbus into the French Alps.

The problems may have meant the end of his flying career, officials disclosed.

He was also treated by several neurologists and psychiatrists for ‘severe overload syndrome’, which can be debilitating. Whether his vision complaints were linked to his psychological difficulties is unknown.

Erratic: Lubitz (pictured) was a master of hiding his darkest thoughts and would wake up from nightmares screaming ‘we’re going down’. He also told his former lover that he was planning a heinous act

Erratic: Lubitz (pictured) was a master of hiding his darkest thoughts and would wake up from nightmares screaming ‘we’re going down’. He also told his former lover that he was planning a heinous act

Tributes: Relatives place flowers in the village of Le Vernet in the French Alps, close to the crash site of the Airbus A320, for the victims
Tributes: Relatives place flowers in the village of Le Vernet in the French Alps, close to the crash site of the Airbus A320, for the victims

Officers reportedly found a variety of drugs used to treat mental illness at his flat in Dusseldorf, appearing to substantiate claims he was severely depressed.

And a former partner described him as a tormented, erratic man who was a master of hiding his darkest thoughts and would wake up from nightmares screaming ‘we’re going down’.

The 26-year-old Germanwings stewardess, known only as Maria W, revealed to a German newspaper how Lubitz ominously told her last year:

‘One day I will do something that will change the whole system, and then all will know my name and remember it.’

It is not clear how severe Lubitz’ eye problems were, but officials confirmed that evidence found at his home suggested he was being treated for psychological issues. It is understood that he hid his health problems from Germanwings.

Two officials with knowledge of the investigation said the authorities had not ruled out the possibility that the problems with his vision could have been psychosomatic, the New York Times reported.

The revelation came after German investigators revealed that the 27-year-old should have been off sick on the day he deliberately flew his 149 passengers and colleagues to their deaths in the Alps.

Investigators said medical sign-off notes were found at his home – including at least one that covered the day of the crash – and Dusseldorf University Hospital confirmed he had been a patient there over the past two months.

While the hospital would not initially disclose his condition, bosses confirmed that he had been evaluated at the clinic in February and on March 10.

The hospital, which has its own eye clinic, later denied speculation that he sought treatment for depression at the centre but would not confirm he had attended for vision problems, citing privacy laws.

It came as German newspaper Welt am Sonntag said police found evidence at his flat which suggested he was suffering from ‘severe burnout syndrome’ – a serious psychosomatic illness.

A source in the police investigation team told the newspaper that Lubitz was treated by several neurologists and psychiatrists, before adding: ‘This is clear from personal notes stored and collected by the pilot.’

‘Severe burnout syndrome’ is a state of emotional, mental and physical ‎exhaustion and is often linked to those in jobs with high stress levels.

It’s symptoms include alienation and negativity towards their work environment and colleagues and it is also known to cause suicidal tendencies and anger issues.

German state prosecutors and police declined to comment on the media reports, adding there would be no official statements on the case before Monday.

Earlier, Lubitz’s former lover Maria, who claimed to have dated the pilot and keen runner for five months after the pair met while flying across Europe together, said he ‘never really’ spoke of illness but she was aware he was receiving psychiatric treatment.

She said they spent ‘several nights’ in hotels together and described him as a ‘nice and open-minded’ man.

However, she claimed there was a difference between his professional and his private ego, with him being ‘soft’ and needing love when the couple were alone but becoming ‘someone else’ when they talked about work.

She told Bild: ‘We spoke a lot about work and then he became another person. He became agitated about the circumstances in which he had to work, too little money, anxiety about his contract and too much pressure.’

His personal problems and erratic behaviour became so severe that the flight attendant decided to call the relationship off after fearing his increasingly volatile temper.

‘During conversations he’d suddenly throw a tantrum and scream at me,’ she said. ‘I was afraid. He even once locked me in the bathroom for a long time.’

Despite parting from Lubitz, Maria said previous conversations with him suddenly ‘made sense’ when she heard about the crash on Tuesday.

She said: ‘When I heard about the crash, there was just a tape playing in my head of what he said: “One day I will do something that will change the system and everyone will then know my name and remember me”.

‘I did not know what he meant by that at the time, but now it’s clear.’

She added: ‘The torn up sick notes make sense now to me and were a clear sign that he did not want to admit that his big dream of flying as a captain was over.’

In the cockpit: Simple controls enabled Lubitz to lock pilot out

 

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